To the girls who travel: Don’t date a guy who doesn’t travel

The Gypsea Chronicles

Yes, you are the girl with the unkempt room and poor time management. You have many things in your head, most of which are notes-to-self on what your future self should do or go to. You are a dreamer, and that means that if the guy you date isn’t like you, it’s unlikely to work out.

Don’t date a guy who doesn’t travel. He is the guy with the medicine cabinet filled with shaving cream, hair gel and toothbrushes he doesn’t use anymore. His skin is fair and soft like a baby’s, which means he doesn’t go out much or at all. He is intolerant to the sun, when in fact you love every minute you are under it, soaking each ray of sunshine into your now bronze skin. He combs and styles his hair in memorized strokes every morning (as he has been doing this for months, maybe years…

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The Wake-Up Times Of Famous Authors

101 Books

You might remember my tirade against morning people a few months ago?

Okay, so it wasn’t really a tirade against anyone—the post was more of a defense of night owls. We’ve been taking a beating the last few years while the trend to praise the morning person as the model of success has gone into overdrive.

As a night owl, I got tired of hearing that I was a slacker, even though I bust my butt getting stuff done after 8 p.m. So I wrote that post.

Then, a few weeks ago, I saw this infographic—which beautifully illustrates everything I tried to articulate in that post.

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The Risks of Web Logging

EsJayBe

I have been asked to reflect on blogging by David Hill at Liverpool University as a contribution to a session being run there on ‘Digital Literacies’.

When I wrote for a student newspaper at the University of York, I found that there was limitation on the things which I was and was not allowed to write. Not that the editors were being ‘unreasonable’, but quite simply that they had the perogative to publish (or not publish) certain arguments and as such were operating a powerful control on my writing through their policing of appearance (something akin to Ranciere’s distribution of the sensible). For this reason, I started ‘blogging’ alongside.

But in the beginning it seemed that no-one was really interested in what I had to say and as such blogging appeared to me as a severly narcissistic practice. Why should anyone read my blog? Was I not contributing to an online culture in which everyone had something to say but nobody…

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The Digital Ties That Bind: Love, Loss and Oversharing in the Internet Age

Ideas

The most serious relationship of my life so far ended last summer without a trace — physically at least. There was no ceremonious “return of the stuff” because there was nothing to return. No boxes of photos and trinkets, no mix tapes, nothing.

There was, however, an extensive virtual trail: thousands of IMs, texts, Tweets, Facebook pictures and Instagram posts. And that’s a lot harder to get rid of than a toothbrush. Love might die, but its digital counterpart never does. There’s just no way to completely scrub your digital self from a relationship in 2014, no quick way to sever digital ties once they’ve been formed and no easy way to tell your social media networks that you’re no longer together.

Of course you can untag pictures and break up on Facebook, but for those who’ve shared a lot, the digital impression of couplehood remains very much alive. That…

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I don’t think so.

Wandering Bark Books

Image courtesy of stockphotosforfree.com Image courtesy of stockphotosforfree.com

On the way home yesterday, I heard an NPR story about how a computer program at MIT has apparently learned how to “help” an MIT media lab student “compose” a sonnet using a database of Shakespeare’s works.

Including only words used by Shakespeare, the program suggests words that The Bard might have used in “that situation,” or, when writing a sonnet.

The transcript clarifies: “It was [Mathias’] sonnet confined to authentic Shakespearean language. It’s the same predictive software we see when our devices try to finish our sentences and suggest the next word.” Great, so a new application of technology.

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The Single Most Annoying Trick People use To Get Your Attention

Just Alyssa

woman-butt-fit What’s the single most annoying trick that people do to get your attention? Headlines like this one. Especially if they’re coupled with photos like this one, which, by the way, has nothing whatsoever to do with what I intend to write about. It’s just a woman’s butt, which is the most surefire way to get people to click on a link. Especially connected with declarations and promises.

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